Important vaccination information – Toddler visiting Thailand.

This article is dedicated to those about to or planning to visit Thailand with their child/children.

Its easy to book a flight and accommodation but your child’s and even your well-being is very important.

There are various risks and diseases around Thailand so please find all important information in regards to what’s required, desired and age ranges for each vaccine.

Routine Vaccinations for Travel
Infants and young children are normally vaccinated against a wide range of diseases, such as hepatitis B, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), seasonal influenza, and measles, with a series of single and combination vaccines given during well-child health care visits. These vaccines often require multiple doses, spaced out over months or years, to create adequate immunity to a disease. By the time a child turns 18, he or she has completed all the doses and booster shots for vaccines against 16 different diseases listed on the current vaccination schedule. The routine vaccination schedule is updated every January on the CDC’s website.

Parents in any state can opt out of vaccinating a child for medical reasons (for example, if a child has a serious immune system problem that could make certain vaccinations dangerous for them). Most states also allow parents to opt out of recommended vaccines for religious or philosophical reasons.

Opting out of a routine vaccination can be risky when you travel abroad, though. Many vaccine-preventable diseases are more common in other countries than in the United States. Vaccine researchers like to remind people that these diseases are “just a plane ride away” in today’s world.

Before your trip, make sure that your child’s routine vaccinations (and your own) are up to date. Also ask your health care provider whether your child needs to start some routine vaccinations early, or finish some vaccination series on an accelerated schedule, to help protect them from disease when you travel.

Recommended and Required Travel Vaccinations:
Six different vaccines are sometimes recommended or required for international travelers. In most cases, these vaccines are not recommended for children under 1 year old. If you’re taking an infant to an area where a vaccine is recommended or required, you will need to take precautions to protect them from exposure to disease, and (if the vaccine is required to enter the area) provide a doctor’s note explaining that the child is too young to receive the vaccine.

The CDC’s online Vaccine Information Statements provide more details on the symptoms of each vaccine-preventable disease, vaccine doses, and potential vaccine side effects and allergic reactions.

Typhoid Vaccine
You might need a typhoid vaccination if you are traveling to South Asia (where the risk of infection is much higher than other areas), Asia, Central or South America, the Caribbean, or Africa. The bacteria that cause typhoid fever are spread by contact with infected human feces, and travelers often catch typhoid fever through food or drinks contaminated with feces. True to its name, typhoid fever usually causes a high fever, along with stomach pain and other problems. Untreated typhoid fever can be fatal.

The typhoid vaccine is recommended if you’re visiting a smaller town or rural area where typhoid fever is common, or visiting friends or relatives in an area where typhoid fever is common. Children age 2 and older can receive the typhoid vaccine as a one-dose injection, which provides protection for two years (get the vaccine at least two weeks before you leave). Children age 6 and older can receive the vaccine as a series of four pills, each spaced two days apart, which provides protection for five years (finish the series at least one week before you leave).

Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine
Japanese encephalitis, common in rural areas of South and Southeast Asia, is caused by a virus spread by mosquitoes. Infection can cause brain inflammation and other problems; a quarter of people infected with Japanese encephalitis die, and brain damage is common in survivors.

Outbreaks of Japanese encephalitis (sometimes referred to as “JE”) are often seasonal, so check your travel dates against the most updated vaccination recommendations online. You might need to get this vaccine if you’re planning to spend a month or more in South or Southeast Asia, if you plan to spend time in rural areas, or if you plan to spend a lot of time outdoors (such as camping).

The three-dose vaccine is given over 30 days, although that timing can be halved if needed with an accelerated vaccination schedule. You should finish the series of shots at least ten days before you leave. Children should be one year or older to receive the vaccine, which probably provides protection for two years.

Hepatitis A Vaccine
Because hepatitis A is extremely common worldwide, it is both a routine childhood vaccination and an often-recommended travel vaccination for children and adults. Like typhoid, the hepatitis A virus is spread by contact with infected human feces, or food or drink contaminated with infected feces.

Children who catch Hepatitis A often have no symptoms, but they can pass on the infection to adults, who become seriously ill. Hepatitis A affects the liver, causing problems such as nausea and stomach pain. An infection can take months to go away, and in some cases the infection can be fatal.

The routine hepatitis A vaccine is given to children after they turn one year old. They receive two doses at least six months apart. One dose of the vaccine, given at any time before you leave, can also provide protection if you do not have time to get the second dose before your trip. The vaccine is believed to provide protection from hepatitis A for 20 years or longer.

Rabies Vaccine

Rabies is a fatal virus spread by the saliva of an infected animal, usually through a bite. The symptoms of rabies infection include hallucinations and seizures. Rabies is rare in the United States, but it is a concern in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America. In these countries, rabies is most often spread by infected dogs, monkeys, bats, and cats.

Although most people get a series of rabies shots only if they are bitten by a rabid animal, travelers who might encounter rabid animals when they are far from medical care can get a pre-exposure (prophylactic, or preventative) rabies vaccine. Children are at special risk for rabies because they often want to play with animals. A pre-exposure rabies vaccine can provide some protection to a child bitten by a rabid animal until you can find medical help.

The pre-exposure vaccine can be given to infants (under 1 year old) or children, in three doses over three to four weeks. If a vaccinated child or adult is bitten by a rabid animal, clean the wound well. Then get another dose of the vaccine as soon as possible, and a final dose three days later.

This five-dose vaccine series can prevent rabies if it is completed before symptoms of rabies appear. Rabies symptoms usually do not begin until weeks or months after exposure.

Yellow Fever Vaccine (Required)
Like Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever is a virus that can occur in seasonal epidemics and is spread by mosquitoes. The virus, which affects your liver and blood, can cause jaundice, fever, and flu-like symptoms. Yellow fever, which can be fatal, is a concern in tropical South America and sub-Saharan Africa.

The one-dose yellow fever vaccine is approved for children 9 months and older; if necessary, it can be given to children as young as 6 months old. You should get the vaccine at least 10 days before you leave. The vaccine provides immunity for 10 years.

Some countries require an International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis (ICVP), which proves you have been vaccinated against yellow fever, before you can enter the country. You can get the vaccination and certificate (which is good for ten years) at a yellow fever vaccination clinic (see Resources).

Some of the countries that require an ICVP for entry will waive these vaccination requirements for infants. If you cannot receive the yellow fever vaccination for medical reasons, a doctor’s letter explaining the reason might be accepted.

Meningococcal Vaccine (Recommended or Required)
The meningococcal vaccine is a routine childhood vaccination, usually given to children around age 11 or 12. The meningococcal vaccine prevents infection with bacteria that can cause disabling or fatal meningitis (brain infection), blood infections, or pneumonia. These infections can develop quickly and spread easily among people who are living or working in crowded conditions.

Since meningococcal outbreaks can occur seasonally in sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine is often recommended for travelers to that region. Outbreaks also occur in Saudi Arabia during the Hajj, or pilgrimage to Mecca. If you travel to Saudi Arabia during the Hajj (the date of each year’s Hajj is based on the Islamic calendar), the meningococcal vaccine is required for entry; you must provide written proof of vaccination.

The one-dose vaccine is licensed for children as young as age 2. It can also be given to children under age 2 if they need the vaccination to enter Saudi Arabia. It should provide protection for three to five years.

There are also precautions you need to take with mosquitoe bites, research the best repellent and carry a first aid kit on you at all times.

Its common sense but will remind all travellers to insure they are covered with the best travel insurance you can buy specially when travelling with children.

Be sure to read through all terms and conditions prior to booking and check the excess rate and it’s affordable.

If you are in doubt with what vaccinations your child needs request an appointment with your travel nurse 60 days prior to travelling as availability is rare in short periods and some vaccinations have to be done over 30 day periods.

Happy travelling ❤✈️

 

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10 flying with a toddler tips.

 

1: Remember to take milk on board with you, they don’t serve any form of milk other then sachets on board. You are able to take liquids through for a baby, they will just get tested.

2: Make sure you have a tablet loaded with multiple programmes and films. Even though long haul flights have the screens built in, you’ll find your toddler will find it easier with a tablet and can play it out loud if they don’t like head phones.

3: Make sure you are loaded with lots of snacks they like, they may get a meal on board but you may find they may go off big portions of food when flying.

4: Be prepared with take off, it could hurt their little ears. A good way to avoid this is to get your baby to have a bottle on take off and landing or get them to have a small snack.

5: Have calpol sachets at the ready, flying could cause them to feel a little unwell and we all know calpol is a god send at the best of times.

6:Make sure they fly comfy, and have spare lighter clothes as it could get warm on the plane. Also be prepared for cold so maybe ensure you have a blanket for them.

7:Small toys are a good thing to have, my son loved playing with his mini figures and small cars on the small table.

8:If you are flying long haul try and get at least one of your family to get extra leg room seats, the baby can then sit on the floor and play (this is essential for long haul)

9: Try and keep calm, babies sense any sort of tension. If he starts crying don’t worry, the more you stress the more he will stress. Take the baby for a walk and maybe just explore the plane. Staff on board will usually help where possible!

10: Have fun, embrace every moment whether this be the first or 10th time flying! It’s an exiting adventure! Get talking to them about it before, show them planes on YouTube and point them in the sky. It will add that extra excitement to the journey!
Happy flying ✈️

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