It’s okay to not be okay.

We can make parenthood out to be as glitz and glam as we want on social media and to our non mum friends but we are actually making it harder for ourselves and future mums.

We need to make not being okay acceptable because it is, it’s perfectly fine to have a day when you are not ok and things are really tough.

I wish it was it was as acceptable to say I’ve had the shittest day ever and get everything off my chest as it is to boast about all the good things my baby/child has done.

I feel that not being ok is a taboo subject, around the topic casts judgments of “is she fit to be a mother?” “is she depressed?” “does she need help?” Neither of these is a true statement because I’m a perfectly good mum but today I’m having a bad day and playing mum is draining.

Some will relate some won’t but I am now a single parent, my little boys dad has him a weekend here and there which makes me sometimes feel he gets all the good parts.

The fun days out, gets to go to work with full energy and no disturbed sleep and I resent him for it, right or wrong for feeling that way I don’t care because it’s how I feel and I’m not ashamed of that.

Today I had a bad day, cleaning the house made me cry, putting reg to bed made me cry, didn’t make myself food because I just couldn’t be bothered and even turning the tv over felt like climbing Mount Everest.

I felt guilty, hurt and felt so lost.

What I realised is all of the above clarifies something! I am human..

I am aloud to have bad days and so are you.

These bad days don’t define us, they make us better parents.

Dont try to avoid your bad days embrace them because you need to let all that inner emotion go, don’t bottle it up. If you need to cry then cry, it’s ok this is not forever.

You are not superhuman and able to face everything with a smile because that’s not how life works unfortunately.

I can’t promise you won’t have lots of days like this but I can promise you the better days will our weigh them.

I am not saying we need to moan about our kids over social media but be as positive as you can about it.

I posted a photo to say, here I am, I am a mother and today I am having a bad day because you know what?! It’s temporary, it’s not forever and I am perfectly fine for being emotional because I am human.

We need to show the world it’s ok not to be ok, it’s really that simple.

I sometimes look at some people’s life on social media and think Jesus I want my life to be like that but then I realise behind those 300 happy posts is probably a unhappy girls with her own problems, it’s okay though she’s human but I can’t help but think there are people wishing for her social media life when really we only want people to see the good bits.

Now, I know that we don’t need to show every time we have a bad day but we need to see more realistic stuff.

I am about to travel south east Asia with my son who’s 2 and I can’t wait to share the highs and lows with you because it’s going to be the best challenging experience ever and I want people to see the real side to it.

The world would be a better place if people didn’t feel the need to be ashamed of not being ok, I am going to open up my DM on Instagram confidentially.

If you need to speak to someone, I am here. If you need to rant, I am here.

Dont be alone, don’t be ashamed and certainly be proud of that bad day it won’t define you.

You are amazing, you are strong and you will get through this.

Alone or not, together we stand as parents to never let anyone feel alone again.

(Instagram – chelsandreg)

feel free to message me x

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Important vaccination information – Toddler visiting Thailand.

This article is dedicated to those about to or planning to visit Thailand with their child/children.

Its easy to book a flight and accommodation but your child’s and even your well-being is very important.

There are various risks and diseases around Thailand so please find all important information in regards to what’s required, desired and age ranges for each vaccine.

Routine Vaccinations for Travel
Infants and young children are normally vaccinated against a wide range of diseases, such as hepatitis B, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), seasonal influenza, and measles, with a series of single and combination vaccines given during well-child health care visits. These vaccines often require multiple doses, spaced out over months or years, to create adequate immunity to a disease. By the time a child turns 18, he or she has completed all the doses and booster shots for vaccines against 16 different diseases listed on the current vaccination schedule. The routine vaccination schedule is updated every January on the CDC’s website.

Parents in any state can opt out of vaccinating a child for medical reasons (for example, if a child has a serious immune system problem that could make certain vaccinations dangerous for them). Most states also allow parents to opt out of recommended vaccines for religious or philosophical reasons.

Opting out of a routine vaccination can be risky when you travel abroad, though. Many vaccine-preventable diseases are more common in other countries than in the United States. Vaccine researchers like to remind people that these diseases are “just a plane ride away” in today’s world.

Before your trip, make sure that your child’s routine vaccinations (and your own) are up to date. Also ask your health care provider whether your child needs to start some routine vaccinations early, or finish some vaccination series on an accelerated schedule, to help protect them from disease when you travel.

Recommended and Required Travel Vaccinations:
Six different vaccines are sometimes recommended or required for international travelers. In most cases, these vaccines are not recommended for children under 1 year old. If you’re taking an infant to an area where a vaccine is recommended or required, you will need to take precautions to protect them from exposure to disease, and (if the vaccine is required to enter the area) provide a doctor’s note explaining that the child is too young to receive the vaccine.

The CDC’s online Vaccine Information Statements provide more details on the symptoms of each vaccine-preventable disease, vaccine doses, and potential vaccine side effects and allergic reactions.

Typhoid Vaccine
You might need a typhoid vaccination if you are traveling to South Asia (where the risk of infection is much higher than other areas), Asia, Central or South America, the Caribbean, or Africa. The bacteria that cause typhoid fever are spread by contact with infected human feces, and travelers often catch typhoid fever through food or drinks contaminated with feces. True to its name, typhoid fever usually causes a high fever, along with stomach pain and other problems. Untreated typhoid fever can be fatal.

The typhoid vaccine is recommended if you’re visiting a smaller town or rural area where typhoid fever is common, or visiting friends or relatives in an area where typhoid fever is common. Children age 2 and older can receive the typhoid vaccine as a one-dose injection, which provides protection for two years (get the vaccine at least two weeks before you leave). Children age 6 and older can receive the vaccine as a series of four pills, each spaced two days apart, which provides protection for five years (finish the series at least one week before you leave).

Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine
Japanese encephalitis, common in rural areas of South and Southeast Asia, is caused by a virus spread by mosquitoes. Infection can cause brain inflammation and other problems; a quarter of people infected with Japanese encephalitis die, and brain damage is common in survivors.

Outbreaks of Japanese encephalitis (sometimes referred to as “JE”) are often seasonal, so check your travel dates against the most updated vaccination recommendations online. You might need to get this vaccine if you’re planning to spend a month or more in South or Southeast Asia, if you plan to spend time in rural areas, or if you plan to spend a lot of time outdoors (such as camping).

The three-dose vaccine is given over 30 days, although that timing can be halved if needed with an accelerated vaccination schedule. You should finish the series of shots at least ten days before you leave. Children should be one year or older to receive the vaccine, which probably provides protection for two years.

Hepatitis A Vaccine
Because hepatitis A is extremely common worldwide, it is both a routine childhood vaccination and an often-recommended travel vaccination for children and adults. Like typhoid, the hepatitis A virus is spread by contact with infected human feces, or food or drink contaminated with infected feces.

Children who catch Hepatitis A often have no symptoms, but they can pass on the infection to adults, who become seriously ill. Hepatitis A affects the liver, causing problems such as nausea and stomach pain. An infection can take months to go away, and in some cases the infection can be fatal.

The routine hepatitis A vaccine is given to children after they turn one year old. They receive two doses at least six months apart. One dose of the vaccine, given at any time before you leave, can also provide protection if you do not have time to get the second dose before your trip. The vaccine is believed to provide protection from hepatitis A for 20 years or longer.

Rabies Vaccine

Rabies is a fatal virus spread by the saliva of an infected animal, usually through a bite. The symptoms of rabies infection include hallucinations and seizures. Rabies is rare in the United States, but it is a concern in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America. In these countries, rabies is most often spread by infected dogs, monkeys, bats, and cats.

Although most people get a series of rabies shots only if they are bitten by a rabid animal, travelers who might encounter rabid animals when they are far from medical care can get a pre-exposure (prophylactic, or preventative) rabies vaccine. Children are at special risk for rabies because they often want to play with animals. A pre-exposure rabies vaccine can provide some protection to a child bitten by a rabid animal until you can find medical help.

The pre-exposure vaccine can be given to infants (under 1 year old) or children, in three doses over three to four weeks. If a vaccinated child or adult is bitten by a rabid animal, clean the wound well. Then get another dose of the vaccine as soon as possible, and a final dose three days later.

This five-dose vaccine series can prevent rabies if it is completed before symptoms of rabies appear. Rabies symptoms usually do not begin until weeks or months after exposure.

Yellow Fever Vaccine (Required)
Like Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever is a virus that can occur in seasonal epidemics and is spread by mosquitoes. The virus, which affects your liver and blood, can cause jaundice, fever, and flu-like symptoms. Yellow fever, which can be fatal, is a concern in tropical South America and sub-Saharan Africa.

The one-dose yellow fever vaccine is approved for children 9 months and older; if necessary, it can be given to children as young as 6 months old. You should get the vaccine at least 10 days before you leave. The vaccine provides immunity for 10 years.

Some countries require an International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis (ICVP), which proves you have been vaccinated against yellow fever, before you can enter the country. You can get the vaccination and certificate (which is good for ten years) at a yellow fever vaccination clinic (see Resources).

Some of the countries that require an ICVP for entry will waive these vaccination requirements for infants. If you cannot receive the yellow fever vaccination for medical reasons, a doctor’s letter explaining the reason might be accepted.

Meningococcal Vaccine (Recommended or Required)
The meningococcal vaccine is a routine childhood vaccination, usually given to children around age 11 or 12. The meningococcal vaccine prevents infection with bacteria that can cause disabling or fatal meningitis (brain infection), blood infections, or pneumonia. These infections can develop quickly and spread easily among people who are living or working in crowded conditions.

Since meningococcal outbreaks can occur seasonally in sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine is often recommended for travelers to that region. Outbreaks also occur in Saudi Arabia during the Hajj, or pilgrimage to Mecca. If you travel to Saudi Arabia during the Hajj (the date of each year’s Hajj is based on the Islamic calendar), the meningococcal vaccine is required for entry; you must provide written proof of vaccination.

The one-dose vaccine is licensed for children as young as age 2. It can also be given to children under age 2 if they need the vaccination to enter Saudi Arabia. It should provide protection for three to five years.

There are also precautions you need to take with mosquitoe bites, research the best repellent and carry a first aid kit on you at all times.

Its common sense but will remind all travellers to insure they are covered with the best travel insurance you can buy specially when travelling with children.

Be sure to read through all terms and conditions prior to booking and check the excess rate and it’s affordable.

If you are in doubt with what vaccinations your child needs request an appointment with your travel nurse 60 days prior to travelling as availability is rare in short periods and some vaccinations have to be done over 30 day periods.

Happy travelling ❤✈️

 

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